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Aboriginal Treaties

Saskatchewan Curriculum Objectives

Social Studies 10
History 10
Native Studies 10
History 30
Native Studies 30

Grade 10 Objectives (Social Studies 10)

Core Concept: Economic Decision Making

  • Know that beliefs and values of a society will affect its social and political organization.

Related Contentent

  • Economic Development in Saskatchewan: During the 19th century, the Federal government made some fundamental decisions about the economy of the prairies and the future of the people there.

  • Look at government documents concerning future of Rupert's Land and the peoples there.

Grade 10 Objectives (History 10)
Objectives
Unit 4: Imperialism

Core Concept: Acculturation

  • Know that nation states are concerned about their ability to hold necessary hinterlands and to protect the transportation lines to those hinterlands.

  • Know that nations are always tempted to use whatever power they have to protect themselves against the insecurity of competition.

  • Know that imperialism is the control of the sovereignty of one nation by another nation.

  • Know that in general terms the relationships between cultures can be based on:

    • accommodation;
    • assimilation;
    • segregation; and,
    • annihilation.

Related Content

  • The use of national power to protect national self interest.

  • Imperialism in North America in the 18th and 19th centuries.

Grade 10 (Native Studies 10)
Unit Three - Governance: Aboriginal Perspectives
Foundational Objectives

  • Know that Euro/Canadian government policies intended to
    1) remove Aboriginal people from their land,
    2) suppress Aboriginal nations and their governments,
    3) undermine Aboriginal cultures,
    4) erode Aboriginal identity.

  • Recognize the effects of an imposed system of governance by examining a specific example.

  • Analyze the concept of contractual agreements.

  • Investigate the factors that led to Aboriginal peoples losing their traditional, historical territories.

  • Infer that Aboriginal peoples had, and have, different experiences with governments regarding their land.

  • Interpret the circumstances under which Métis people lost their land.

  • Research the unique land agreements between the Inuit and various governments.

Unit Four - Economies: Aboriginal Perspectives
Foundational Objectives

  • Recognize that Aboriginal peoples were economically self-reliant prior to European contact.

  • Analyze the factors that disrupted traditional Aboriginal economies.

  • Explain the importance of a land base to Métis economic well being.

Grade 12 Objectives (History 30)
Unit 1: Relationships: People and Paradigms
Foundational Objective 1
Know that a worldview is a comprehensive viewpoint that explains the nature of reality, creates expectations, and provides meaning and purpose for people's lives.

Core Concept: Paradigms

  • Know that the Europeans operated with a set of paradigms, concerning sovereignty, property, and equality of peoples and societies, that differed greatly from the paradigms of the First Nations.

  • Know that these paradigms influenced the perceptions and actions of both individuals and groups within European and First Nations societies.

Foundational Objective 2

Know that every society will evolve assumptions and practices that surround the key societal relationship between the peoples and the "land".

Core Concepts: Land

  • Know that First Nations assumptions about ownership of the land did not mirror those held by the colonizing Europeans.

  • Know that the Europeans viewed North America as being a vast reservoir of resources to be utilized by those willing to extend the effort and expend the costs of acquiring those resources.

Foundational Objective 3
Know that within every society, there will exist a contest among groups to gain influence over the societal decision-making processes.

Core Concepts: Decision Making

  • Know that the colonizing powers were determined to institute their decision-making paradigm on their colonies in North America.

  • Know that colonial decision making was the prerogative of the governing European power rather than either the residents of the colonies or the First Nations.

Foundational Objective 4
Know that the well-being of every society will be influenced by sustained contact with other societies.

Core Concepts: Acculturation

  • Know that British colonial policies, directed towards French Canadians and the First Nations, fluctuated between attempts to assimilate those populations and attempts to accommodate them.

Core Concepts: Assimilation

  • Know that assimilation is the belief that when a weaker and supposedly inferior culture comes into contact with a superior culture, people from the inferior culture can be educated to understand and practise the norms of the superior culture.

Unit 2: The Nineteenth Century: The Road to Democracy
Foundational Objective 1
Know that within societies, there exists a competition among interest groups for influence over the society's decision-making processes, and that those groups will vary in terms of their ability to influence those processes.

Core Concept: Decision Making

  • Know that the regions of Canada have varying degrees of political and economic influence over national decision making.

  • Know that the federal government did not involve the Aboriginal population and other residents of Rupert's Land in determining their opinions and needs.

Core Concept: Métis

  • Know that Canadian acquisition of the North West had consequences for the Métis people of that region.

  • Know that large-scale migration of Euro-Canadian settlers to the North West was seen by the Métis as a threat to their traditional economy and cultural identity.

  • Know that the Métis sought, through negotiations, recognition and protection of their rights and landholdings.

Core Concept: First Nations

  • Know that one of the goals of the Canadian government was to implement policies that would lead to assimilation of the First Nations who resided in the former Rupert's Land.

  • Know that the Canadian government planned to relocate the First Nation peoples to reserves and thereby make the land available for European settlers to establish an agricultural-based economy.

Core Concept: Treaties

  • Know that the Canadian government planned to acquire the lands of the Canadian West by negotiating treaties with the First Nations and that those treaties extinguished First Nations' land claims.

  • Know that the First Nations and the Canadian government held differing assumptions concerning the terms and meaning of the treaties.

Foundational Objective 3
Know that the history of the Canadian peoples has been greatly influenced by external forces and events.

Core Concept: External Influence
Related Content
The Search for Economic Well-being: The National Policy

  • The Canadian West and the Euro-Canadian Vision

  • Securing the Canadian West: New Canadians and Their Well-being

  • The Treaties and the Indian Act

Unit 5: Challenges and Opportunities
Foundational Objective 1
Know that within the Canadian community, seeking of new relationships that satisfy the needs of an increasingly diverse society is proving to be a difficult process.

Core Concept: Assimilation

  • Know that through agencies such as the Department of Indian Affairs, the federal government established the goals and priorities of policies directed at Aboriginal people.

  • Know that the assimilation of Aboriginal peoples remained the desired option of government.

Grade 12 (Native Studies 30)
Unit One: Aboriginal and Treaty rights
Foundational Objectives
Knowledge

  • Understand the factors of diversity of Aboriginal nations of Canada.

  • Understand the basis of Aboriginal rights.

  • Understand the effects of Canada's expansionism of the 1800s.

  • Understand the basis of Treaty rights.

  • Understand the interpretation and basis for interpretation of Aboriginal and treaty rights.

Values

  • Develop an appreciation of the complex nature and uniqueness of Aboriginal societies and the rights of peoples in those societies.

Skills/Processes

  • Develop and use the vocabulary appropriate to identity analysis that reflects cultural sensitivity.

  • Seek information through a steadily expanding network of options, including individuals, databases, agencies, other libraries and community events.

  • Develop personal and social skills and abilities relevant to cooperative learning.

  • Identify, categorize, analyze, synthesize and evaluate data from a variety of sources.

  • Use a wide range of language experiences for developing knowledge of a subject area.

  • Practice skills of problem solving and consensual decision making.

Unit Three: Land Claims and Treaty Land Entitlements
Foundational Objectives
Knowledge

  • Understand the basis and procedure for resolving comprehensive land claims.

  • Understand the basis and procedure for resolving treaty land entitlements, one type of specific land claim.

  • Understand the basis and various procedures employed in settling Métis land claims.

Values

  • Develop an appreciation of the complexity of treaty land entitlement and land claim processes.

  • Develop compassion, empathy and fair-mindedness and make positive contributions to society as individuals and as members of groups.

  • Develop an appreciation of the special relationship of Aboriginal people to the land as the basis for cultural distinctiveness and status.

Skills/Processes

  • Summarize important understandings from a variety of media and sources.

  • Draw inferences, make generalizations, and reach tentative conclusions using evidence from a variety of media and sources.

  • Synthesize with prior knowledge and understanding ideas gleaned from a variety of media and other sources.

  • Develop understanding of the uses of mathematical concepts in everyday life.

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