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Saskatchewan Curriculum Objectives


History 10
Social Studies 10
History 30
Social Studies 30


Grade 10 Objectives (History 10)
Objectives
Unit 4: Imperialism

Core Concept
Acculturation

  • Know that nation states are concerned about their ability to hold necessary hinterlands and to protect the transportation lines to those hinterlands.

Related Content

  • The use of national power to protect national self interest.

  • Imperialism in North America in the 18th and 19th centuries.


Grade 10 Objectives (Social Studies 10)

Core Concept
Economic Decision Making

  • Know that beliefs and values of a society will affect its social and political organization.

Related Content

  • Economic Development in Saskatchewan: During the 19th century, the Federal government made some fundamental decisions about the economy of the prairies and the future of the people there.

  • Look at government documents concerning future of Rupert’s Land and the peoples there.


Grade 12 Objectives (History 30)
Unit 1: Relationships: People and Paradigms
Foundational Objective 1

Know that a worldview is a comprehensive viewpoint that explains the nature of reality, creates expectations, and provides meaning and purpose for people's lives.

Core Concept
Paradigms

  • Know that the Europeans operated with a set of paradigms, concerning sovereignty, property, and equality of peoples and societies, that differed greatly from the paradigms of the First Nations.

  • Know that these paradigms influenced the perceptions and actions of both individuals and groups within European and First Nations societies.

Foundational Objective 2
Know that every society will evolve assumptions and practices that surround the key societal relationship between the peoples and the "land".

Core Concepts
Land

  • Know that First Nations assumptions about ownership of the land did not mirror those held by the colonizing Europeans.

  • Know that the Europeans viewed North America as being a vast reservoir of resources to be utilized by those willing to extend the effort and expend the costs of acquiring those resources.

Loyalists

  • Know that the Loyalists constituted a sizable segment of the population of the Thirteen Colonies and were opposed to the efforts of those promoting American independence, preferring to continue a political connection with the British Crown.

  • Know that half of the Loyalists migrated north to British North America and significantly influenced the political evolution of British North America.

  • Know that the Loyalists expected to retain their existing political rights, including representative government, upon their migration to British North America.

Foundational Objective 4
Know that the well-being of every society will be influenced by sustained contact with other societies.

Unit 2: The Nineteenth Century: The Road to Democracy
Foundational Objective 1

Know that within societies, there exists a competition among interest groups for influence over the society's decision-making processes, and that those groups will vary in terms of their ability to influence those processes.

Core Concept
Decision Making

  • Know that the federal government did not involve the Aboriginal population and other residents of Rupert's Land in determining their opinions and needs.

Métis

  • Know that Canadian acquisition of the North West had consequences for the Métis people of that region.

  • Know that large-scale migration of Euro-Canadian settlers to the North West was seen by the Métis as a threat to their traditional economy and cultural identity.

  • Know that the Métis sought, through negotiations, recognition and protection of their rights and landholdings.

First Nations

  • Know that one of the goals of the Canadian government was to implement policies that would lead to assimilation of the First Nations who resided in the former Rupert's Land.

  • Know that the Canadian government planned to relocate the First Nation peoples to reserves and thereby make the land available for European settlers to establish an agricultural-based economy.

Foundational Objective 3
Know that the history of the Canadian peoples has been greatly influenced by external forces and events.

Core Concept: External Influence
Related Content
The Search for Economic Well-being: The National Policy

  • The Canadian West and the Euro-Canadian Vision

  • Securing the Canadian West: New Canadians and Their Well-being

  • Unrest in the West: Riel and National Unity

Unit 5: Challenges and Opportunities
Foundational Objective 1

Know that within the Canadian community, seeking of new relationships that satisfy the needs of an increasingly diverse society is proving to be a difficult process.

Core Concepts
Diversity

  • Know that the Canadian community had become increasingly diverse since the end of the Second World War, and that Canadians of non-British, non-French and non-Aboriginal backgrounds sought both recognition of the nation's diversity, and meaningful participation in all aspects of Canadian life.

Identity

  • Know that changing immigration demographics are creating new dynamics in terms of relations among the peoples of Canada and have brought prominence to the debate of what it means to be Canadian.

Immigration

  • Know that there was significant opposition by segments of the Canadian population to admitting immigrants who were not from the British Isles or the United States.

  • Know that xenophobia is a fear and/or intense opposition to internal minority groups because of their perceived foreign connection.

  • Know that, at the beginning of the 20th century, some Canadians believed that Eastern European and Asian immigrants were a threat to established British, Anglo-Saxon values and institutions.

  • Know that restrictive immigration policies found support within the Canadian labour movement.

  • Know that existed considerable opposition to Asian immigration has existed.

  • Know that new realities are impacting relations between new Canadians and the existing populations.

  • Know that in the last decades of the 20th century the number of immigrants from Asia, Africa and Latin America has grown.

  • Know that changing immigration demographics are having social, economic and political ramifications for Canadian society.

  • Know that this immigration has created new dynamics in terms of relations among the peoples of Canada and has brought prominence to the debate of what it means to be Canadian.

Assimilation

  • Know that the assimilation of Aboriginal peoples remained the desired option of government.

  • Know that there were societal expectations that immigrants to Canada should undergo a process of assimilation and adopt Canadian values, practices and beliefs.

  • Know that immigration policy has always reflected a dialectic between the desired population increase, the impact of immigration on established "Canadian" assumptions and values, and the racial and ethno-cultural composition of the country.

  • Know that the Immigration Act of 1952 prohibited immigrants from entering Canada for reasons of nationality, geographic origin, peculiarity of custom, unsuitability of climate, and probable inability to be "readily assimilated."


Grade 12 Objectives (Social Studies 30)
Unit 2: Economic Development
Knowledge Concepts

Worldview

  • Canadian Worldview

    • Know that Canadians in the Victorian era believed:
      ­ that humanity was clearly directed to develop the wilderness by imposing human will and purpose on it;
      ­ that this belief could be demonstrated by building railroads, breaking the sod, building cities, and civilizing any residents found there; and,
      ­ that those who did not do this were inferior.


Core Concept

Paradigms

  • Know that the Europeans operated with a set of paradigms, concerning sovereignty, property, and equality of peoples and societies, that differed greatly from the paradigms of the First Nations.

  • Know that these paradigms influenced the perceptions and actions of both individuals and groups within European and First Nations societies.

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