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Judging Acts

Ontario Curriculum Expectations

Grade 7 Social Studies
Grade 8 Social Studies
Grade 10 Aboriginal Peoples in Canada
Grade 11 Understanding Canadian Law (University Prep)
Grade 11 Understanding Canadian Law (Workplace Prep)
Grade 12 Canada: History, Identity, and Culture
Grade 12 Canadian and International Law
Grade 12 Aboriginal governance: Emerging Directions


Expectations (Grade 7 Social Studies)
History: Conflict and Change
Overall Expectations

By the end of Grade 7, students will:

  • describe the causes, personalities, and results of the rebellions of 1837 in Upper and Lower Canada

  • evaluate the social, economic, political, and legal changes that occurred as a result of the rebellions

Specific Expectations
Understanding Concepts
By the end of Grade 7, students will:

  • explain the major political changes that resulted from the rebellions and their impact on the Canadas (e.g., Durham Report, union of the Canadas, achievement of responsible government)

History: All Above
Specific Expectations

Developing Inquiry/Research and Communication Skills
By the end of Grade 7, students will:

  • formulate questions to facilitate research in specific areas

  • analyse and describe conflicting points of view about a series of historical events

  • communicate the results of inquiries for specific purposes and audiences, using media works, oral presentations, written notes and reports, drawings, tables, charts, and graph


Expectations (Grade 8 Social Studies)
History: Confederation
Overall Expectations

By the end of Grade 8, students will:

  • demonstrate an understanding of the factors that contributed to Canada's Confederation

Specific Expectations
Understanding Concepts
By the end of Grade 8, students will:

  • identify external and internal factors leading to Confederation (e.g., political deadlock, inter-colonial trade, reciprocity, Corn Laws, Fenians, Manifest Destiny, transportation, defence)

History: All Above
Specific Expectations

Developing Inquiry/Research and Communication Skills
By the end of Grade 8, students will:

  • formulate questions to facilitate research on particular topics

  • locate relevant information, using a variety of sources

  • analyse, synthesize, and evaluate historical information

  • analyse and describe conflicting points of view about an historical issue

  • communicate the results of inquiries for specific purposes and audiences, using media works, political cartoons, oral presentations, written notes and reports, drawings, tables, charts, and graphs


Expectations for Aboriginal Peoples in Canada
Grade 10, Open
Sovereignty
Overall Expectations

By the end of this course, students will:

  • identify historic and contemporary events affecting the self-determination of Aboriginal peoples

Methods of Historical Inquiry
Overall Expectations

By the end of this course, students will:

  • research and explain historical topics and issues related to Aboriginal peoples

  • research and describe relevant information about Native studies using a variety of sources of information

  • demonstrate understanding of how to analyse and evaluate information when conducting research on a historical topic or issue

  • demonstrate the ability to apply insights gained in Native studies to other situations and communicate the results of research in oral and written presentations


Expectations for Understanding Canadian Law
(Grade 11, University/College Preparation)
Heritage
Overall Expectations

By the end of this course, students will:

  • identify the historical roots of Canadian law

Specific Expectations
Law-Making
By the end of this course, students will:

  • identify the key components of the Constitution of Canada, including the division of powers between the two levels of government


Expectations for Understanding Canadian Law
(Grade 11, Workplace Preparation)
Heritage
Overall Expectations

By the end of this course, students will:

  • describe the historical development of Canadian law


Expectations for Canada: History, Identity, and Culture
(Grade 12, University Preparation)
Communities: Local, National, and Global
Overall Expectations

By the end of this course, students will:

  • analyse the principal characteristics of the French and English colonial experiences in Canada

Specific Expectations
Colonial Canada
By the end of this course, students will:

  • demonstrate an understanding of colonial history as it contributed to the concept of Canada as the product of "two founding nations" (e.g., Royal Proclamation of 1763; Québec Act, 1774; Constitutional Act, 1791; Lord Durham's Report; Confederation)

Change and Continuity
Overall Expectations

By the end of this course, students will:

  • evaluate the extent to which Canada has been transformed into a pluralistic society

Specific Expectations
Cultural Pluralism
By the end of this course, students will:

  • assess whether British colonial policies were directed towards the creation of a homogeneous society in Canada (e.g., Articles of Capitulation; Treaty of Paris, 1763; Québec Act, 1774; Act of Union, 1840; nineteenth-century immigration policies)

Citizenship and Heritage
Overall Expectations

By the end of this course, students will:

  • demonstrate an understanding of the characteristics of the French presence in Canada and its contributions to Canadian identity

Specific Expectations
French-Canadian Identity
By the end of this course, students will:

  • describe the historical roots and modern manifestations of bilingualism and biculturalism and how events have shaped the meaning of these terms

  • describe the role of significant Québec-based political figures in the development of the French presence in Canada (e.g., Louis-Hippolyte LaFontaine, Henri Bourassa, Maurice Duplessis, Pierre Trudeau, René Lévesque, Jeanne Sauvé)

Social, Economic, and Political Structures
Overall Expectations

By the end of this course, students will:

  • describe and evaluate the nature of the Canadian political system and the groups and individuals who contributed to its development

Specific Expectations
Political Structures
By the end of this course, students will:

  • describe the role of selected significant events and legislation in the development of the current Canadian political system (e.g., the Conquest; the Québec Act; the Constitutional Act, 1791; the Rebellions in Upper and Lower Canada; responsible government; Confederation; the Balfour Report; the Constitution Act, 1982)

Methods of Historical Inquiry
Overall Expectations

By the end of this course, students will:

  • demonstrate an understanding of historians' methods of locating, gathering, and organizing research materials;

  • critically analyse interpretations related to Canadian history, culture, and identity

  • communicate opinions and ideas based on effective research clearly and concisely

  • demonstrate an ability to think creatively, manage time efficiently, and work effectively in independent and collaborative study


Expectations for Canadian and International Law
(Grade 12, University Preparation)
Rights and Freedoms
Overall Expectations

By the end of this course, students will:

  • demonstrate an understanding of the historical development of human rights legislation in Canada

  • explain the development of constitutional law in Canada

Specific Expectations
Human Rights in Canada
By the end of this course, students will:

  • explain the evolution of Canadian human rights legislation from English common law to the Canadian Bill of Rights and then the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms

Canadian Constitutional Law
By the end of this course, students will:

  • demonstrate an understanding of key events in Canadian constitutional history (e.g., the British North America Act, 1867; the Constitution Act, 1982; the Meech Lake Accord; the Charlottetown Accord)


Expectations for Aboriginal Governance: Emerging Directions
Grade 12, University/College Preparation
Relationships
Overall Expectations

By the end of this course, students will:

  • describe the changing nature of the legal and political relationships between Aboriginal peoples and the government of Canada

Specific Expectations
Aboriginal and Canadian Relations
By the end of this course, students will:

  • describe ways in which history influences the current relationship between Aboriginal peoples and the government of Canada (e.g., Royal Proclamation of 1763, the Jay Treaty of 1794, pre-Confederation treaties, the eleven "numbered treaties" from 1871 to 1921);

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